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Trauma Recovery

Coping with Traumatic Events

Overview

A traumatic event is a shocking, scary, or dangerous experience that can affect someone emotionally and physically. Experiences like natural disasters (such as hurricanes, earthquakes, and floods), acts of violence (such as assault, abuse, terrorist attacks, and mass shootings), as well as car crashes and other accidents can all be traumatic. Researchers are investigating the factors that help people cope or that increase their risk for other physical or mental health problems following a traumatic event.

Warning Signs

Responses to trauma can be immediate or delayed, brief or prolonged. Most people have intense responses immediately following, and often for several weeks or months after a traumatic event. These responses can include:

  • Feeling anxious, sad, or angry
  • Trouble concentrating and sleeping
  • Continually thinking about what happened

For most people, these are normal and expected responses and generally lessen with time.

In some cases, these responses continue for a longer period of time and interfere with everyday life. If they are interfering with daily life or are not getting better over time, it is important to seek professional help. Some signs that an individual may need help include:

  • Worrying a lot or feeling very anxious, sad, or fearful
  • Crying often
  • Having trouble thinking clearly
  • Having frightening thoughts or flashbacks, reliving the experience
  • Feeling angry, resentful, or irritable
  • Having nightmares or difficulty sleeping
  • Avoiding places or people that bring back disturbing memories and responses.
  • Becoming isolated from family and friends

Physical responses to trauma may also mean that an individual needs help. Physical symptoms may include:

  • Headaches
  • Stomach pain and digestive issues
  • Feeling tired
  • Racing heart and sweating
  • Being very jumpy and easily startled

Individuals who have a mental health condition or who have had traumatic experiences in the past, who face ongoing stress, or who lack support from friends and family may be more likely to develop more severe symptoms and need additional help. Some people turn to alcohol or other drugs to cope with their symptoms. Although substance use may seem to relieve symptoms temporarily, it can also lead to new problems and get in the way of recovery.

Ways to Cope

Healthy ways of coping in this time period include:

Resources:

Free App for Sleep, Anxiety and Stress
RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)
National Sexual Violence Resource Center
National Domestic Violence Hotline
Psychology Today: What is Domestic Violence?
National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
Community Works-Jackson County
Women's Crisis Support Team- Josephine County
National Human Trafficking Hotline
End Slavery Now- Sex Trafficking
Redemption Ridge- Jackson and Josephine County Sex Trafficking Resource


Recovery Club-RWC
President: Amanda Packard amandaabennett1987@gmail.com 
Vice President: Kris Sutton asabovesobelow2273@gmail.com
Advisor: Sadie Barr sbarr@roguecc.edu

Meditation Club-RVC
President: Stavros Castaldini castalstavros@gmail.com
Advisor: Brandon Atkins 541-245-7701 BAtkins@roguecc.edu