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SOC - Sociology

SOC199 (variable credits)
Special Studies: Sociology
Selected topics of study in sociology are offered on demand through workshops, seminars, lecture, lab, and/or independent study format. This course is designed to: Provide students with opportunities to explore in greater depth specific topics in the field of sociology which are presented in the introductory sociology courses; Provide other RCC departments with a variety of subject offerings designed to address problems, issues and concerns which are unique to their specific discipline; Provide flexibility in meeting elective sociology credits by allowing and encouraging students to research areas of sociology not currently taught in the sociology curriculum. Prerequisites: May vary depending on subject offerings.

SOC204 (4 credits)
Introduction to Sociology
Surveys theories and findings of sociology, including culture, individuals and groups, socialization, stratification and social control. It is designed to acquaint students with the social forces that impact the lives of individuals. Close attention is paid to social class, gender, and race as they impact life experiences. Focus is primarily on U.S. and Western societies, with some cross-cultural comparisons. Fulfills cultural literacy requirement within the Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer degree. Prerequisites: WR115 or BT113 or designated placement score.

SOC205 (4 credits)
American Society
Examines the organization of various American social institutions such as family, education, religion, politics, health care, criminal justice, media and economics, and analyzes distinctive features and how each are changing. Each social institution is examined in relation to how social class, gender and race inequalities manifest, and how inequalities are perpetuated. Social change and social movements are also studied. Fulfills cultural literacy requirement within the AAOT degree. Prerequisites: WR115 or BT113 or designated placement score.

SOC211 (3 credits)
Social Deviance and Social Control
Examines deviance and social control from a sociological perspective, showing how deviance is relative to cultural norms. Includes how deviant identities and subcultures are formed, and types of deviance that have a positive impact on society. Covers crime and punishment, white-collar crime, family violence, sexual variance, drug subcultures, cults, and social activism leading to positive social change. Prerequisites: BT113 or WR115 or designated placement score. Recommended prerequisite: SOC204.

SOC213 (4 credits)
Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.
A sociological examination of the various social, political, economic and legal forces affecting diverse racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. This includes an analysis of American history, families, housing, education, employment and immigration patterns, and racial and ethnic interactions. Includes a focus on the intersection of race, gender and social class and on social movements to counter inequalities. Fulfills cultural literacy requirement within the AAOT degree. Prerequisites: WR115 or BT113 or designated placement score.

SOC218 (4 credits)
Sociology of Gender
Introduces sociological perspectives on gender. Central themes include the social construction of gender, socialization, changes and continuities in gender norms and identities, the body, globalization and the connections between gender, power and inequality. The course emphasizes the ways in which gender intersects with race, social class and sexual orientation. The focus is primarily on U.S. and Western societies, with some cross-cultural material. Fulfills cultural literacy requirement within the AAOT degree. Prerequisites: BT113 or WR115 or designated placement score.

SOC221 (4 credits)
Juvenile Delinquency
Presents a philosophical, historical, and practical survey of juvenile justice administration in the United States. In the context of an interdisciplinary framework, theories, factors, and characteristics of delinquency will be presented and treatment and delinquency prevention programs will be surveyed. Dual numbered as CJ201. Prerequisite: WR115 or designated placement score. Recommended prerequisite: LIB127.

SOC225 (4 credits)
Social Problems and Solutions
Introduces students to various social problems in the U.S. from a sociological and global perspective. Some of the social problems covered may include social inequality, food, environmental and health issues, crime and deviance, problems in the family and poverty. A focus on solutions will include a study of public policies employed by various societies. Major theories of sociology are introduced and applied. Prerequisites: WR115 or BT113 or designated placement score.

SOC228 (4 credits)
Environment and Society
Examines the relationship between societies and the environment including how cultural, social, economic and political forces have impacted the earth and natural environment. Explores the causes and consequences of topics such as population growth, consumerism, global warming, pollution and environmental racism and classism. An emphasis will be placed on the study of social movements, cultures and public policies that advance sustainability. The focus is primarily on U.S. and Western societies, with some cross-cultural material. Prerequisites: WR115 or BT113 or designated placement score.

SOC230 (4 credits)
Introduction to Gerontology
Introduces students to the field of gerontology and explores the relationships between the aging individual and society. Prerequisites: WR115 or BT113 or designated placement score.

SOC235 (4 credits)
The Chicano/Latino Historical Experience
Examines the diversity that resides within the Chicano, Mexicano, Latino, Hispanic and Caribbean cultural experience in the Americas, beginning from pre-Columbian times to the present. The curriculum covers pre-Columbian heritage, Spanish colonization, American conquest in the Mexican-American War and the Spanish American War, the Mexicans' role in American labor, Bracero Program, and the Chicano Movement. The class will provide a framework for understanding the ways in which distinctive social and cultural patterns arose, thus bringing awareness of contemporary expressions of identity and their historical origins. Dual numbered as HST259. Prerequisites: BT113 or WR115 or designated placement score.

SOC237 (4 credits)
Communication, Relationships and Technology
Introduces students to the personal and social perspectives of communicating through technology and focuses on the implications of computer-mediated communication. Current themes and theories focusing on the use of technology to communicate within relationships and to gain access to resources such as health care and education are introduced and applied. A variety of topics will be explored, including online relationships, social interactions, the workplace, Web-based instruction, impression management, therapy and health care. Concepts such as ethics, confidentiality, accessibility, identity, trust, and global implications will be explored. Prerequisites: WR115 or BT113 or designated placement score.

SOC243 (4 credits)
Drugs, Crime and Addiction
Introduce students to the dynamics of drug and alcohol addiction and the social and legal issues of drug abuse. Examines the political considerations behind contemporary drug enforcement policy. Explores the historical origins of the illegal drug trade. Dual numbered as CJ243. Prerequisite: WR115 or designated placement score.

SOC244 (4 credits)
Introduction to Criminology
Offers an interdisciplinary perspective of crime and criminal behavior in relation to the criminal justice system. Theoretical approaches to explaining crime, criminal statistics, typologies, and victimology will be assessed. The influence of crime theory on public policy will be explored. Dual numbered as CJ200. Prerequisite: WR115 or designated placement score. Recommended prerequisite: LIB127.

SOC280 (variable credits)
CWE/Sociology
Cooperative Work Experience is an educational program that enables students to receive academic credit for on-the-job, experiential learning based on skills acquired in their programs. Together, the instructor, employer, and student establish learning objectives that specify the significant and appropriate learning which is expected to result from the work experience. This course offers a career-related experience for students working for an approved employer. As a capstone course, it should be completed within the last two terms of a certificate or degree program. Prerequisite: CWE courses require prior arrangements with faculty or the Department Chair.